Late Summer Beach Walk

Before the wet weather set in, we took a late afternoon walk at Umina Beach to enjoy the clear views across Broken Bay to Lion Island.

Late summer beach walk

The water was warm but had a bit too much weed and jelly blubbers for my liking for swimming.

Late summer beach walk

The wind was certainly up that day, so it was a parasailer’s paradise.

Late summer beach walk

Of course, every day is a good day for dog walking. Once again, fur children of all shapes and sizes were in force along the beach, and generally getting on quite well together.

Late summer beach walk

Weather Watch

Well after the scorching summer we had we’re now into a rather rainy phase. It makes venturing into the city a bit of a task.

Weather Watch

But stand still for long enough, and I notice some wondrous things amongst the everyday.

Weather Watch

The changeable weather also brings great clouds as well as rain.

Weather Watch

And seeing a patch of blue after a grey day, I begin to understand why those in colder, greyer climes are so ecstatic when the sun comes out.

Weather Watch

The Collection – Part 1

A visitor to our house will very soon notice that there are geological items everywhere. Many are Hubby’s, but quite a few are also mine. As you might guess, I am quite interested in paleontology and fossils, so here are two specimens from my collection.

Ammonites are fascinating and beautiful marine creatures. Their fossils can be found all over the world in various sizes from thumbnail to a few feet. This fossil is from South Africa, and is quite big at about 15cm in size. It’s from the Late Cretaceous period, so it was living at the time of the dinosaurs, shortly before the great extinction event that wiped them, and also the ammonites, out.

Fossil and mineral collection

An older but no less fascinating prehistoric animal is the trilobite. They were marine creatures that lived in the oceans long before fish, and certainly long before animals colonised land. Today, they look a lot like the Balmain Bug, though they’re distantly related. Their fossils can be found all over the world, in 2D and 3D. I love the 3D fossils, which have been painstakingly extracted using dental drills. Most 3D trilobites come from Morocco, but this specimen comes from St Petersburgh, Russia, and is about 460 million years old, from the Middle Ordovician period.

Fossil and mineral collection