Tag Archives: walk

Hobart

Well, it might have taken me awhile, but we’ve finally come to the final chapter of our 2019 Tasmanian trip – a short visit to Hobart. On this visit, we stayed in the historic inner city suburb of Battery Point. It is on a hill and so affords a good view of the Derwent River.

Battery Point Walk

While wandering around the local park, hubby was happy to find out that it had had a famous scientific visitor in the past.

Battery Point Walk

Wandering around Battery Point and its neighbouring suburb, Sandy Bay, we were happy to see a lot of colonial era houses still in good condition. Probably not surprising since they’re two of the most expensive suburbs of Hobart.

That’s all from Tasmania. But I’ve done some travelling since then, so I’ll be back with more adventures soon!

Launceston – Part 2

Being a town founded in the 19th Century, there were quite a few Victorian era buildings.

Launceston

But in the Mall, there were quite modern sculptures of our favourite extinct marsupial, the thylacine, aka. the Tasmanian Tiger.

Launceston

We saw lots of representations of the thylacine in Launceston, and saw more exhibits in Launceston’s Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery. In the museum we came upon this little quote.

Launceston

And another amusing quote we found in the museum, very relevant for some people I know.

Launceston

Launceston – Part 1

The New Zealand series is now done and dusted but there are plenty of photos left to go through from past trips. For the next while, I’ll be examining more of Tasmania, where we spent two weeks in December 2019.

The strongest memory from that trip was simply being able to breathe fresh air again, as Sydney had been under a smokey haze from successive bush/forest fires for months by that time. The trip starts up north in Launceston and ends in Hobart.

Launceston is a city I have visited, but generally only in passing. It was good to spend a few quiet days there getting used to the Tasmanian pace of life (which is generally relaxed).

Launceston is a sizeable town by Australian standards and pretty big by Tasmanian standards. Having its first European settlement in 1804, it is also quite an old colonial settlement, though the first Tasmanians arrived some 40,000 years ago, when the Bass Strait was still land, and were isolated from the mainland 8000 years ago when the sea levels rose after the last ice age.

The age of the settlement meant that there are buildings of varying ages in the CBD.

The post office is gothic Victorian.

Launceston

While this building is in the 19th century classical style.

Launceston

There are some terraces.

Launceston

And art deco.

Launceston

But my favourite was relic from the past.

Launceston

Christchurch – Part 3

Still in deep lockdown… So don’t really want to talk about anything too dark today. Actually, I want to show you the ways that Christchurch has rebuilt itself in the time following the disaster.

In my previous post, I concentrated on the ruins, and you might remember seeing the ruins of the Anglican Cathedral. The people of Christchurch didn’t want to be without a place of worship for too long, so they quickly commissioned the Cardboard Cathedral, which was opened 2.5 years after the earthquake.

Christchurch CBD Creativity

It’s a very creative and positive building to enter, and when we visited there was a lot of activity. It was supposed to be temporary, but I heard they’ve decided to make it a permanent fixture for the city.

In other places around the city they’ve planted gardens where there were buildings. This one is a memorial garden in the place where the CTV station building was.

Christchurch CBD Creativity

Other places are getting rebuilt in typical 2010’s style.

Christchurch CBD Creativity

However there are places that are a little more innovative. Christchurch is famous for its use of shipping containers as structures.

Christchurch CBD Creativity

And some interesting sculptural elements.

Christchurch CBD Creativity

Christchurch CBD Creativity

And finally there’s a proliferation of street art everywhere you look, on old and new buildings.

Christchurch CBD Creativity

Christchurch CBD Creativity

Christchurch CBD Creativity

Christchurch CBD Creativity

The combination of all this artwork is very moving. It shows a city that’s rebuilding itself using art. We can learn a lot from that.

Christchurch – Part 2

Walking around the CBD at Christchurch in 2018, I was of course struck by the level of devastation that the earthquake had caused. But in saying that, I was also struck by the things that have survived.

Christchurch 2018

Christchurch 2018

Christchurch 2018

Looking at these photos, it was reassuring that the old-time pioneers built such hardy buildings.

Christchurch 2018

Christchurch 2018

And even when the buildings were damaged, the fact that they survived in some form (as in the case of the Anglican Cathedral) is astonishing.

Christchurch 2018

A walk to Fossil Point – Part 2

Once over the dunes, the beach stretched out before us.

Walk to Fossil Point

Walk to Fossil Point

We were on the windy west coast, and boy, was it windy. And everything was on a vast scale.

Walk to Fossil Point

Walk to Fossil Point

Our destination turned out to be these boulders of beach rock, as they contained fossils – shells that are remnants of the sea floor that existed during the Miocene period, approximately 10 million years ago.

Walk to Fossil Point

We also had a little surprise when we searched for fossils.

Walk to Fossil Point

Luckily, he was having a long nap and hardly stirred, else we would have been in trouble.

A walk to Fossil Point – Part 1

We are venturing out on one more walk in Golden Bay before we head off elsewhere. This walk is to the southern end of Farewell Spit. The spit forms the most northernly point of Golden Bay, and indeed, the South Island of New Zealand. It stretches out 26km into the sea, and being so exposed, it is the site of frequent whale strandings.

We didn’t venture to the far end of the spit as that requires a 4WD or a 6 hour tour. We did however venture to the end of another no-through-road and walked across some boggy paddocks.

Walk to Fossil Point

Between the sea and the paddocks are some low dunes.

Walk to Fossil Point

These trees give you an idea of how windy it gets in these parts (though it was pretty calm in the paddocks during our walk).

Walk to Fossil Point

A walk to Wharariki Beach – Part 2

Happy New Year everyone! Let’s hope 2021 is at least a little better than its predecessor. Now back to our walk to Wharariki Beach.

After the paddocks came the dunes, and then the expanse of white sand beach.

Wharariki Beach

There were other people there, but you wouldn’t call it a ‘crowd’, although for Golden Bay it might have been.

Wharariki Beach

Hubby had fun exploring as the geology of the place was quite interesting.

Wharariki Beach

Humans weren’t the only visitors here. There’s a little colony of New Zealand fur seals there.

Wharariki Beach

This wasn’t my first visit to this beach. I did this walk way back in 2004 as well.

A walk to Wharariki Beach – Part 1

Merry Christmas everyone. I hope you had a lovely (if perhaps cosy) time with your family.

Now, back to my 2018 trip to New Zealand. I must say that this reminiscence has been good for me. It’s providing me with a great opportunity to relive that trip and really cherishing it. I hope you’re enjoying these posts too.

We’re still in the Golden Bay area of New Zealand, and today we’re walking to Wharariki Beach, which is in the north-western corner of the region.

The beach is accessed via a walking track across some paddocks from the end of a dirt road.

Wharariki Beach

We passed through some interesting coastal vegetation. The stream is brown due to the tannin in the water (like in Tasmania) and the bushes are flat as it’s almost always very windy in these parts.

Wharariki Beach

It was however a fine, sunny, early summer’s day, so walking these paddocks was a pleasure.

Wharariki Beach

Collingwood – Part 3

One of the loveliest things to do on an extended beach break is the meander on the beach at all hours.

Collingwood views

There was plenty of opportunity to do that in Collingwood as the town is on a huge sand spit.

Collingwood views

Collingwood views

One can wander about in all directions for hours upon end, often without seeing another soul.

Collingwood views

Once on the sand, there were plenty of things to see. I was very interested in seeing what the sand hid and then consequently revealed when the tide receded.

Collingwood views

Collingwood views

Collingwood views

Collingwood views

Collingwood views

Collingwood views