Tag Archives: fauna

Lake St Clair – Part 3

Being in the middle of Tassie, you might wonder if there were any animals about. There were, though many of them were elusive. The most accessible were actually the marsupials. We have seen pademelons before way back in Stanley.

Pademelon
A pademelon grazing.

But it was my first glimpse of the following two animals. As I said in my previous post, the cooler Tasmanian weather produces some interesting adaptations to otherwise run-of-the-mill ‘mainland’ species. Look at these two and see how they differ from their northern cousins.

Tasmanian Wombat
Tasmanian wombat
Tasmanian Echidna
Tasmanian echidna.

And the big lake is of course stocked with trout, for all those keen anglers.

Brown Trout
Brown Trout.

Northern Tasmania – Part 6

‘The Nut’ can be seen from most of Stanley.

From the road into town.

Stanley, Tasmania

From the middle of town.

Stanley

And from the beach.

Stanley

But what about the view from the top? The Nut is 143m tall so it’s a bit of a hike up there. But there is a short-cut for the less fit – the chair lift.

And it’s a great view from the top.

Of the town.

Stanley from 'The Nut'

The coastline.

Stanley from 'The Nut'

And the port.

Stanley from 'The Nut'

While strolling on the Nut or the town, keep a lookout for these guys – pademelons…

Pademelon

Northern Tasmania – Part 5

Hello there! Hope you had a lovely Christmas and start of the New Year. Covid has returned to Sydney. For those of you who managed to get away, congratulations. For those who didn’t, I’m continuing to post from my travel archives this year.

I’m continuing to post on our 2019 trip to Tasmania. I see that some of you have managed to get to the Apple Isle lately. Enjoy!

Anyway, back to the town of Stanley. It might have been founded from whaling, but people soon realised that the land was perfect for grazing. This is the house of the chief agent of the Van Diemen’s Land Company, called Highfield.

Stanley

It’s still surrounded by grazing land to this day. The pastures start from the edge of town.

Stanley

And these days the cattle they rear in these parts are the best in Australia.

Cattle in Stanley

The reason? They have no problem with water around here – look at all that grass. No wonder the cattle thrive.

A walk to Fossil Point – Part 2

Once over the dunes, the beach stretched out before us.

Walk to Fossil Point

Walk to Fossil Point

We were on the windy west coast, and boy, was it windy. And everything was on a vast scale.

Walk to Fossil Point

Walk to Fossil Point

Our destination turned out to be these boulders of beach rock, as they contained fossils – shells that are remnants of the sea floor that existed during the Miocene period, approximately 10 million years ago.

Walk to Fossil Point

We also had a little surprise when we searched for fossils.

Walk to Fossil Point

Luckily, he was having a long nap and hardly stirred, else we would have been in trouble.

A walk to Wharariki Beach – Part 2

Happy New Year everyone! Let’s hope 2021 is at least a little better than its predecessor. Now back to our walk to Wharariki Beach.

After the paddocks came the dunes, and then the expanse of white sand beach.

Wharariki Beach

There were other people there, but you wouldn’t call it a ‘crowd’, although for Golden Bay it might have been.

Wharariki Beach

Hubby had fun exploring as the geology of the place was quite interesting.

Wharariki Beach

Humans weren’t the only visitors here. There’s a little colony of New Zealand fur seals there.

Wharariki Beach

This wasn’t my first visit to this beach. I did this walk way back in 2004 as well.

Over the Hill

From Nelson, we drove further into the north-west of the island. Our destination, the mystical Golden Bay. But to get there, we had to traverse the notorious Takaka Hill, which separates Golden Bay from the rest of New Zealand (for those who think that NZ isn’t isolated enough from the rest of the world).

On Takaka Hill

The pass is around 791m high, but seems higher since we can see down to sea level a lot of the time. There’s Nelson in the mist!

On Takaka Hill

At the top of the hill is Hawkes Lookout. Time to stretch and photograph the views.

On Takaka Hill

We also met some of the local birdlife. The weka is a common flightless bird in these parts. They’re not shy but not mischievous either.

On Takaka Hill - a Weka

Hubby, ever the geologist, was interested in the rocks protruding from the hillside. They’re limestone. These hills are the crunch point between the two tectonic plates that Australia and New Zealand are on.

On Takaka Hill

Being a bit of a Lord of the Rings fan back in the day, I thought these types of rocks look familiar. A bit of research uncovered that they did film in the general area, although much higher up (with the aid of helicopters). And probably in winter (we visited in early summer).

From the Vineyards to the Mountains

The next morning we took one last look at our vineyard retreat in Renwick.

Morning at the Vineyard

Morning at the Vineyard

Morning at the Vineyard

We then drove up the Wairau Valley, over 90km – and incredibly, most of that way was past vineyards. No wonder the Marlborough region produces so much wine. At the end of the drive were the Nelson Lakes at the foot of the mountains.

Lake Rotoiti

We visited Lake Rotoiti, although there are two of them. These mountains form the start of the Southern Alps, which run 500km down the spine of the South Island.

Lake Rotoiti

Strange to see sea-birds here, but the lake is only 70km or so from the sea.

Lake Rotoiti

Marlborough Region – Part 2

Let’s take a walk through the vines.

Marlborough Winery stay

It’s only early summer so the grapes are just starting to fruit. They won’t be ready until Easter time.

Marlborough Winery stay

There aren’t many predators around so the rabbits still run free.

Marlborough Winery stay

And Mother Duck can still rear her ducklings.

Marlborough Winery stay

The hydrangeas are blooming nicely.

Marlborough Winery stay

There might be a storm overnight, but in New Zealand the weather doesn’t usually hang around too long.

Marlborough Winery stay

Time to head inside for the night.

Kaikoura – Part 3

After lunch, we drove around to Point Kean, to the south side of town. The weather was perfect for early December (i.e. Early summer).

Seal viewing at Point Kean

Around the point, we passed a remnant of an old homestead. I’m guessing the sea level has risen quite a bit since it was first built.

Seal viewing at Point Kean

And it we didn’t have to go far to see our first seal. These are all New Zealand fur seals, and can be found on rocky shores throughout mainland New Zealand, the Chatham Islands, and the sub-Antarctic islands, as well as parts of Australia.

Seal viewing at Point Kean

These seals were pretty used to humans, and other animals too, it seems.

Seal viewing at Point Kean

Victorian Trip Round-Up and In Memoriam

From Mansfield, we headed on home, taking the scenic route through the Alps via the little town of Corryong, home to the real ‘Man from Snowy River’, Jack Riley.

Man from Snowy River

It was 35C that day – not very alpine weather! We spent the night in Tumut and got home the next day.

I had sketched regularly during the trip, and here are some of them.

Alice Barker House pond

Stringybark

Delatite Winery

This was to be the last car holiday we’d make with our dear beagle, Bridie. She passed away in mid-August after a short illness. We were glad that she got to travel all the way to Victoria – she loved a drive and a sniff!

Going Home

Rest in peace, old girl.

Enjoying the view