Tag Archives: denmark

Eat For Scandi! – Part 1

In the past, my experience of Scandinavian food consisted of the offerings of Ikea and eating Danish pastries, so finding out the reality of all was fascinating. What was obvious was that no matter the country, Scandinavians loved their fish. They would eat it three times a day! On offer at our Copenhagen hotel breakfast buffet, along with dark rye breads, was cold meats, boiled eggs, cheese, and pickled herring! Oh, and those Danishes too.

At lunchtime, we also had fish and bread, this time as an open sandwich. Below, I tried out the smoked eel with scrambled egg, while Hubby tries a version of a crab salad. The bread came with two different spreads – the ubiquitous Lurpak butter, and lard with bacon bits. The latter was surprisingly tasty.

A day in Copenhagen

At dinner time, there was also plenty of fish, prepared and accompanied simply. Hubby tried the pan-fried plaice.

A day in Copenhagen

I tried the pan-fried salmon – also very tasty. Much of the salmon eaten in the region came from farms in Norway, where the water is cold and clean.

A day in Copenhagen

I’ll be reporting back on Scandi food as I post my way through them.

Copenhagen – Part 4

Copenhagen reminded me a lot of Amsterdam because of its pragmatic architecture and its canals – a remnant from its days as a busy port and trading post.

A day in Copenhagen

In the city centre there were many canals to see, although the boats and ‘warehouses’ are now pleasure crafts and converted apartments.

A day in Copenhagen

And on the northern edge of the city centre is Copenhagen’s most underwhelming tourist attraction.

A day in Copenhagen

The Little Mermaid was certainly little and didn’t do much for me. Still, it didn’t stop others from mauling her.

A day in Copenhagen

Copenhagen – Part 3

Copenhagen has its share of grandness too. They are though quite pragmatic about the use of their palaces. One is currently being used to house parliament.

A day in Copenhagen

While this set of four (by British standards) smallish palaces house the Danish Royal Family. Princess Mary was nowhere to be seen that day, by the way, but it certainly is a long way from the Slip Inn.

A day in Copenhagen

It was an altogether more casual set up than at Buckingham Palace. No Secret Service-like security guards, just the ceremonial guards. And the no heaving crowds either, just small groups of casual tourists. Just the way I like a tourist attraction to be.

A day in Copenhagen

Copenhagen – Part 2

Copenhagen was rather depressing in the middle of a rainstorm…

A day in Copenhagen

But a different creature altogether when the sun was out.

A day in Copenhagen

The city centre was quite a grand place, with a wealth of 18th Century buildings.

A day in Copenhagen

It was the period when the English and the Dutch were at war, hence all the Baltic Sea trading that used to go through Amsterdam and the English east coast all came to Copenhagen. Using the funds, the Danes built a city to equal old Amsterdam.

A day in Copenhagen

Copenhagen – Part 1

We were excited to be in Copenhagen, home of our Princess Mary, and of our favourite Danish series, The Killing. Our first impression is of a cosmopolitan, and very Northern European city. Like in neighbouring Germany and Netherlands, there was a large volume of bikes on the streets. I was quite impressed with the number of bikes on display at Copenhagen’s central railway station.

A day in Copenhagen

And at one of the city centre bus stations. I’ve never seen a double-storey bike-park before.

Can you imagine Sydneysiders riding bikes to Central to catch a train? They’d either be run over before they arrived, or the ‘Grey Ghosts’ would fine them on the spot for parking.

A day in Copenhagen

Elsewhere in the city centre, there was lots of bike riding on cobble-stoned streets.

A day in Copenhagen

And lots of bike parking in the pretty parks.

A day in Copenhagen

Apparently even the Danish Royal Family use their bikes to get around. Can you imagine the British Royal Family doing that? Or indeed, would Mr Abbot?

Over the Sea… By Rail

Next we explore the city of Copenhagen, capital of Denmark. Having Eurail passes, we chose to go by rail, and it was certainly an experience. When we reached the North Sea, the train was ‘picked up’ by a giant ferry.

Travelling to Germany from Denmark

We went on a 45 minute ride across the sound.

Travelling to Germany from Denmark

Until the train ‘alighted’ on Danish soil, and meandered over the Danish countryside to Copenhagen.

Travelling to Germany from Denmark

Only in Europe, I think.