Tag Archives: travel

Hobart

Well, it might have taken me awhile, but we’ve finally come to the final chapter of our 2019 Tasmanian trip – a short visit to Hobart. On this visit, we stayed in the historic inner city suburb of Battery Point. It is on a hill and so affords a good view of the Derwent River.

Battery Point Walk

While wandering around the local park, hubby was happy to find out that it had had a famous scientific visitor in the past.

Battery Point Walk

Wandering around Battery Point and its neighbouring suburb, Sandy Bay, we were happy to see a lot of colonial era houses still in good condition. Probably not surprising since they’re two of the most expensive suburbs of Hobart.

That’s all from Tasmania. But I’ve done some travelling since then, so I’ll be back with more adventures soon!

Victorian Trip Round-Up and In Memoriam

From Mansfield, we headed on home, taking the scenic route through the Alps via the little town of Corryong, home to the real ‘Man from Snowy River’, Jack Riley.

Man from Snowy River

It was 35C that day – not very alpine weather! We spent the night in Tumut and got home the next day.

I had sketched regularly during the trip, and here are some of them.

Alice Barker House pond

Stringybark

Delatite Winery

This was to be the last car holiday we’d make with our dear beagle, Bridie. She passed away in mid-August after a short illness. We were glad that she got to travel all the way to Victoria – she loved a drive and a sniff!

Going Home

Rest in peace, old girl.

Enjoying the view

Chiltern

20km south-east of Rutherglen is the small town of Chiltern. It’s half the population of Rutherglen, but just a quaint.

Chiltern

Chiltern

Like Rutherglen, the beautiful buildings came courtesy of the Gold Rush in the 1860s. Like this old Bank of New South Wales.

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Chiltern

There was even a bit of Chinese history in the town.

Chiltern

You know you’re in country Australia when you see sights like these.

Chiltern

Chiltern

Stubbies and thongs may represent the Australia of the past, but I think a cup of coffee (with a bit of coffee art) represents the Australia of the present.

Chiltern

Rutherglen

Our first stop was the town of Rutherglen. An hour out of Albury and close to the Murray River, it’s a quaint North-East Victorian town with lots of lovely architecture.

Rutherglen

Rutherglen

The second picture is of our bed and breakfast – that allows dogs! So Bridie was happy.

An early morning walk took me to the paddock around the back of the B&B, where I encountered some ladies having their breakfast.

Rutherglen

Rutherglen

Rutherglen is famous for its wines, and we sampled a few (Pfeiffer, Andersons and Cofield are just three). The wines (both sweet and table) were delicious, and since all the wineries are generally small operators, we even got to talk to some of the wine makers. And for those contemplating a road trip with their furry friends, many cellar doors even allow dogs.

The Road to Gundagai

We’re starting a new journey today. Last December, we took a road-trip from Sydney to Central Victoria and back.

Our first leg took us through the town of Gundagai, with its quaint old buildings and brand-spanking-new pavements.

Gundagai

It was a chance for everyone to stretch their legs, including our old beagle, Bridie. Note the sign in the park – we’re definitely not in the city anymore!

Gundagai

There were a few monuments in town. We didn’t see the famous dog and tucker box statue as it was out of town, but we did stumble past Dad, Dave, Mum and Mabel, along the road to Gundagai.

Dad, Dave, Mum and Mabel

But the monument that was most touching was the tribute to two Wiradjuri men, Yarri and Jacky Jacky, who saved the township during the 1852 flood.

The Great Rescue of Yarri and Jacky Jacky

The Red Centre – Part 6

We take a turn about the town, and saw some interesting sites, including this mural at the back of Coles Supermarket.

Coles Mural

And then for our last stop we climbed atop Anzac Hill for a panoramic view of the Alice.

Anzac Hill

Anzac Hill

The MacDonnell Ranges are never far away and look as spectacular as ever. Pity that this visit is so short.

Anzac Hill

We could even see the Ghan from the top. Look closely, and you can see that it is ridiculously long.

Anzac Hill

One last view of the Territory State flag.

Anzac Hill

And its state flora, the Sturt Desert Rose.

Anzac Hill

The Red Centre – Part 2

Jumping on to the bus, we were off around Alice Springs for our tour.

Old Telegraph Station

Our first stop was at the Old Telegraph Station – the reason that Alice Springs was founded in the first place.

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Old Telegraph Station

The early explorers thought that this place had a permanent water source. Unfortunately, they didn’t realise that the area had just had a downpour, and that the springs were only temporary.

Old Telegraph Station

We saw some wildlife though – a rock wallaby in particular – so there must be some water somewhere out there, though not enough to sustain a settlement.

Old Telegraph Station

Nitmiluk Gorge – Part 4

The rainstorm lasted less than ten minutes – brief like most Northern Australian storms. The clouds very soon cleared, and it was as if it had never been.

Cruising Nitmiluk Gorge

As we cruised back to our starting point, we were able to enjoy some beautiful afternoon light, and temperatures that were 10C lower than when we started.

Cruising Nitmiluk Gorge

Then it was back to the train, ready for our next off-train adventure.