Tag Archives: launceston

Northern Tasmania – Part 1

That’s all from Launceston, but it’s the beginning of our drive around Tassie.

Launceston

The next morning we made our way north along the Tamar Valley and stopped at the little town of Beaconsfield. It was up until 2012 a gold mining town. A mine collapse in 2006 contributed to its end.

The town was founded in the mid 1800s and was quite a prosperious place. Now it houses the Mine & Heritage Centre.

Downtown Beaconsfield

Downtown Beaconsfield

Downtown Beaconsfield

Launceston – Part 2

Being a town founded in the 19th Century, there were quite a few Victorian era buildings.

Launceston

But in the Mall, there were quite modern sculptures of our favourite extinct marsupial, the thylacine, aka. the Tasmanian Tiger.

Launceston

We saw lots of representations of the thylacine in Launceston, and saw more exhibits in Launceston’s Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery. In the museum we came upon this little quote.

Launceston

And another amusing quote we found in the museum, very relevant for some people I know.

Launceston

Launceston – Part 1

The New Zealand series is now done and dusted but there are plenty of photos left to go through from past trips. For the next while, I’ll be examining more of Tasmania, where we spent two weeks in December 2019.

The strongest memory from that trip was simply being able to breathe fresh air again, as Sydney had been under a smokey haze from successive bush/forest fires for months by that time. The trip starts up north in Launceston and ends in Hobart.

Launceston is a city I have visited, but generally only in passing. It was good to spend a few quiet days there getting used to the Tasmanian pace of life (which is generally relaxed).

Launceston is a sizeable town by Australian standards and pretty big by Tasmanian standards. Having its first European settlement in 1804, it is also quite an old colonial settlement, though the first Tasmanians arrived some 40,000 years ago, when the Bass Strait was still land, and were isolated from the mainland 8000 years ago when the sea levels rose after the last ice age.

The age of the settlement meant that there are buildings of varying ages in the CBD.

The post office is gothic Victorian.

Launceston

While this building is in the 19th century classical style.

Launceston

There are some terraces.

Launceston

And art deco.

Launceston

But my favourite was relic from the past.

Launceston