Tag Archives: derbyshire

Eat for England! – Part 2

Out of London, the choices were not so varied, but the quality of good old fashioned British cooking and local ingredients were hard to beat. In Chatsworth, I had a Ploughman’s lunch that was of the highest order, complete with a pork pie, homemade bread, assorted cheeses and pickles and salad that was mostly sourced from the estate itself.

Ploughmans lunch at Chatsworth House

The bed and breakfast places that we stayed at were a constant source of good food. In Cornwall, our B&B also served afternoon tea. I had a Cornish tea with scones, jam and the (in)famous clotted cream.

Cornish Cream Tea

In Derbyshire, the owner of our B&B had hand-caught the trout that we ate for dinner in the Derwent River, conveniently located across the road. Needless to say, the trout was succulent and awesome.

Baked Rainbow trout at the Cables B and B

Walk Up Masson Hill – Part 2

We continued the ascent, passing trees long bare, and shrouded in snow.

Masson Hill Walk

Riber Castle, on the next hill, was almost always in view. Unlike other heritage buildings in the area, the castle is a 19th Century creation, and hence relatively new. Unfortunately, the upkeep has been too much for a succession of owners, and the castle is at present abandoned.

Masson Hill Walk

After an hour’s walk, we finally reached the top of the hill, at Geoff’s Seat.

Masson Hill Walk

It would be a lovely place to sit in summer, when you have views like this to contemplate on. In the middle of the snow, we took a few photos and continued on.

Masson Hill Walk

On the other side of the hill we again have views of Riber Castle, which sits above High Tor. We certainly climbed far that day!

Masson Hill Walk

That’s all from Derbyshire. Next time, we’re heading south to more hospitable climes.

Walk Up Masson Hill – Part 1

We are still in the Peaks district for this series – we are walking up Masson Hill, which behind the B&B. It was the day after our visit to Chatsworth, and the weather hasn’t really improved.

Masson Hill Walk

But we walked anyway. Matlock was free of snow by this stage, as the early views of the town atest.

Masson Hill Walk

But the snow was quite thick on the ground as we ascended further up the hill.

Masson Hill Walk

We walked over countless stiles and through many fields. The snow was two inches deep in places. Soon we were high up above Matlock.

Masson Hill Walk

Inside Chatsworth House – Part 4

There were more frescoed ceilings to gaze up on, particularly in the wing that formed the Royal Suites.

Inside Chatsworth House

It was furnished in the late 17th Century for William III and his wife Mary II, hence why everything was so grand. Unfortunately, they never came. Other royalty did however visit the house – Queen Victoria visited it twice; once when she was still a princess, and later with Prince Albert.

One thing the Dukes had in common over the years was their love of art – there are works throughout the house, both classical and modern. There was also a separate sculpture gallery that housed precious busts from Ancient Greece, such as the one below.

Inside Chatsworth House

As well as Italian sculptures from the Renaissance.

Inside Chatsworth House

The gallery was conveniently located next to the dining room, so that guests could peruse the collection while waiting for dinner to be served. It however did not have a bust of Mr Darcy (aka. Actor Matthew Macfadyen) – he was in the gift shop!

Inside Chatsworth House

Inside Chatsworth House – Part 3

The Downton Abbey-like sumptuousness continued in the dining hall. It still gets used occasionally in this way, but I wouldn’t want to be the one ironing the tablecloth or polishing the dinner service. In the old days before gas or electric lights, the maximum time allowed for a meal is four hours – the time it takes for the candles to burn out.

Inside Chatsworth House

Hubby said he’d love to have a library like this. I would think there were a few rare books here.

Inside Chatsworth House

Inside Chatsworth House – Part 1

We entered Chatsworth House, and what an entrance it was.

Inside Chatsworth House

The original house was Elizabethan but was added to over the years. The facade of the northern wing that we saw was an 18th Century creation, but in the entrance hall one could see the original Elizabethan vision, with its wonderful Italian fresco ceiling.

The grand staircase contained portraits of inhabitants past and present. The main painting of the horseman with sabre drawn was of the 1st Duke of Devonshire, who lived in the 17th Century.

Inside Chatsworth House

Walk to Chatsworth House – Part 4

It was getting colder by the minute.

Walk to Chatsworth House

We hoped that the house would appear soon. And it did.

Walk to Chatsworth House

Chatsworth is a grand old house, and very popular with visitors. There were quite a few in the house and in the grounds, and it was a weekday in the dreads of March. I imagine that there would be twenty times that amount on a nice July weekend.

We passed through the golden gates.

Walk to Chatsworth House

And into the inner garden, where there were lots of little things of interest.

Walk to Chatsworth House

Walk to Chatsworth House

Walk to Chatsworth House

Walk to Chatsworth House

Next, we enter the house proper.