Tag Archives: england

Cape Town – Part 4

Another remnant of the Dutch colony of Kap Staad is the old fort, the Castle of Good Hope, built in the 17th Century. It was where the first commanders and their entourage lived, and though it had been fitted with cannons, they were never fired in anger.

Castle of Good Hope

Castle of Good Hope

The fort used to sit right on the beach, but since land was reclaimed and the coast line moved 1km further out to sea, it now sits by the highway and railway. Table Mountain views abound from here.

Not far away was the Company’s Garden that the Dutch established, initially to grow food for passing ships, but later expanded to include a pleasure garden.

Company Gardens

Company Gardens

I saw a local goose walk by, spring chicks in tow.

Company Gardens

And there was a statue of Cecil Rhodes, a somewhat divisive figure of Colonial Africa now, though he did much for South Africa.

Company Gardens

Cape Town – Part 3

Cape Town has had an interesting history as a colony. It was in the hands of the Dutch who docked to replenish food supplies on their sometimes year-long voyages from Europe to Asia in the 16th and 17th Century. There’s evidence of that it some of the buildings around the city, like this old church.

Historical Cape Town

Historical Cape Town

And this house Dutch-style house.

Historical Cape Town

Then the British took over in the 19th Century and brought their brand of Victoriana with them. It’s in the public buildings.

Historical Cape Town

Historical Cape Town

Historical Cape Town

And in the churches.

Historical Cape Town

Historical Cape Town

When the 20th Century came around, there was once again a burst of building in the Art Deco style.

Historical Cape Town

Historical Cape Town

It’s quite a cosmopolitan place.

Eat for England! – Part 1

Before I move on to Greece, I need to post once more about England, and it’s about quite an important aspect of travel – food!

I was actually pleasantly surprised with the food all throughout the country. It’s certainly an improvement from when I was last in the country, some 13 years ago. It looks like the English have finally embraced Asian food of all kinds, not just from the sub-continent. There were Japansese, Vietnamese and even Korean restaurants in central London. My favourite dishes were from restaurants in the East End.

Kid goat at Moro Restaurant

Kid goat with roasted beetroot, rainbow chard and lentils from Moro in Islington. The combination of spices and top ingredients was heavenly.

Braised Ox Cheeks at St John

Braised ox cheeks at St John in Clerkenwell. This must be one of the first restaurants to embrace nose to tail cooking. The tenderness of the ox cheeks has to be eaten to be believed.

This was just two of many great dishes we ate in London. Next, food in the countryside.

Matlock Bath… and a Morning Surprise

We stayed at The Cables B&B, with homely cottage rooms, great breakfasts, and even greater dinners. It is half-way between the towns of Matlock Bath and Matlock. Matlock Bath is a tourist town that was quite forlorn out of season, while Matlock is a working town.

The Cables B&B

The B&B sits under High Tor, a granite cliff that towers over the river Derwent. This was our view in the afternoon upon arriving.

The Cables B&B

But we got a shock the next morning… snow!

Snow at Matlock

More snowy adventures soon.

Across the Pennines

We are heading now to the north of England, where it was distinctly colder than the south! After visiting some relatives in Lancashire, we took the train across the Pennines, the ridge of hills and mountains between the counties of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Train ride across the Pennines

The ride took us from the old Lancashire town of Accrington, to the Yorkshire city of Leeds. Along the way, we passed through many villages.

Train ride across the Pennines

Many were built from local stone and dated back to the Industrial Revolution of the 19th Century, when many were mill towns.

Train ride across the Pennines

And we passed many pastures, moors, and snow-covered hill-tops. Spring-time snow, that’s a novelty for a Sydney-sider!